Career Tips Fri, 5 Jan 18 by "Launch Recruitment Team"

How To Set and Achieve Your Career New Year’s Resolutions For Business & Beyond

Research suggests that if you’ve had your new year’s resolutions laid out from day one, 25% will have already given up by day seven. In fact, only 8% keep their resolutions for the entire year. So is it really worth setting new year’s resolution for your career or business? Short answer, yes.

Resolutions in the workplace are a great way to self-reflect and identify any shifts in values that have changed over the years, it’s also a good way to help unify your team and help create a more collective vision of what is important and what the year ahead could look like.

Resolutions can be executed to impact different scales; personal, team, or an entire business level. Whichever you choose, we’ve compiled the best tips that can put you in the 8% to make it happen for you in 2018.

Set SMART goals
The SMART framework used in many projects can also be applied to your New Year’s resolutions, meaning your goals should be:
Specific – the more specific you make your resolution, the more powerful your plan and execution will be, since you’ll know exactly what to accomplish.
Measurable – Clearly define how you will measure your progress in reaching your resolution. Make the criteria you use to measure quantifiable, reliable and consistent.
Attainable – this is person specific. Are the resolutions you’ve set realistically attainable by you? What hurdles can you anticipate, how much energy and time is required? Is there flexibility or urgency?
Relevant – The relevance of a resolution is deeply connected to the values and priorities of your professional and personal self. It’s a good time to look at the “why” in your resolutions and if it is inline with your values and priorities.
Time-bound – Time is not just money but it also works as a powerful tool for urgency. Create a deadline plan for everything you or your team want to achieve, from the smallest daily practices to the larger executional pieces. It’s also important to define and acknowledge the milestones you reach, as this helps give perspective.

Share your resolution and progress with friends and family
When setting out to achieve a resolution, social support is key. Find yourself an “accountability buddy”, this has shown to increase your chances of sticking to and achieving your goals substantially. Studies have found that more than 70% of the people who wrote down their goals and sent weekly updates to a friend, reported successful goal achievement. This is in contrast to the 35% who created a goal and kept it to themselves, and were either less than halfway to achieving their goal or had given up completely, which isn’t that surprising – after all, it’s a lot easier to break a promise to yourself than having to admit it to a friend.

Phrase your resolutions as if you’ve already achieved them
Phrase your goal in a way that enables your subconscious and intuition to be present. Describe the goal as already completed and use gratitude as the foundation.  Studies show that participants who keep gratitude lists are more likely to have made progress toward important personal goals (professional, academic, interpersonal and health-based) over a two-month period, compared to subjects in the other experimental conditions.

Find people who have already achieved your goal and let their experience mentor you
Find someone who has been there, done that and has the T-shirt to prove it. If you want to step up in your career, learn a new skill, grow your business or implement more downward dogs in your day, align yourself with someone who has already achieved this. Endeavour, a nonprofit that supports high-impact entrepreneurs across the world, investigated some of the leading tech companies and their founders, to find out how and why they were more successful than others within the industry. Results found those most successful were those with strong personal connections and mentor-mentee relationships with the founders of other successful companies.
So it’s important to identify who has already walked the path you’re on, leverage from their mistakes or setbacks and learn how and why they chose a particular way to achieve it. If you’re lucky enough, you’ll be able to build or strengthen a relationship face-to-face or online, but you could also do some research and discover other people’s journeys by reading up on their story. These people will ultimately act as a mentor and will help you achieve your goals in less time than it would take to figure it all out on your own.

No matter your resolution, 2018 has just begun and is open to endless possibilities, here’s to joining the 8%!